Category: Troubleshooting



10. Tweak Your BIOS

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeWhen you first set up your computer, your BIOS is set up to make things a bit more convenient for you, but once you’re all set up, those things can be disabled. If you hold the DEL key when you start up your computer (or whatever key your BIOS tells you to enter setup), you can turn on the “Quick Boot” option and move your hard disk to the top of the boot priority list. The Quick Boot setting will turn off the tests your computer runs when it first turns on, and the boot priority tweak will tell your computer not to look for CDs, thumb drives, or other media when it first starts, which will get you booted into your OS quicker. If you ever need to boot from CD though, you’ll have to go back into the BIOS and change this again before you do.

9. Clean Out Programs that Launch at Startup

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeOne of the most tried and true ways to speed up your boot process is to keep unnecessary programs from starting up with your computer. You can do this by runningmsconfig from the Start Menu‘s search box, and going to the Startup tab. This applications list will tell you what each of those applications does, so you know which ones you can disable and which ones you don’t want to. Previously mentioned Soluto is also a fantastic way to clean up these programs, and these days it’s got a bunch of other handy features that make it worth a download.

8. Delay Windows Services That Run at Startup

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeMany people argue that disabling Services from msconfig will also speed up your boot time, but we’ve found that this is more problematic than anything. However, you can delay certain startup services so that your computer boots quickly and then worries about them later—after all, you don’t need all those services the minute you start up your machine.

7. Change Your Boot Menu‘s Timeout Values

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeIf you’re dual-booting your machine, then your boot menu probably has a “timeout value”, meaning the amount of time it waits for you to make a selection before it just boots into the default OS. On Windows, this timeout value is often 30 seconds, which is a long time to wait if you aren’t looking directly at your screen. To change this timeout value, head to msconfig and click on the BOOT.INI tab, and change the number in the timeout box to something lower. If you’re dual-booting with Linux, you’re probably running the GRUB boot menu, and you can change the timeout on that too.

6. Disable Unused Hardware

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeYour computer loads a lot of drivers when it first starts up, some of which you might not even use. Head into the Device Manager from the Start Menu’s search box, and look for anything you aren’t using—Bluetooth controllers, modems, and virtual Wi-Fi adapters are common culprits. Right-click on the entry you want to disable and hit “Disable”. Remember to only do this with things you don’t actually use—if you use Wireless Hosted Networks, you’ll need to keep those virtual Wi-Fi adapters enabled. It’s also worth mentioning here that keeping all your drivers up to date will help this portion of the startup time, too (which you can do with the help of a program like previously mentioned Device Doctor).

5. Keep Your Antivirus Running and Up to Date

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeThis should go without saying, but we’ll say it anyway: install some antivirus software, keep it up to date, and run a regular scan. This is more of a preventative measure than an actual boot-speeding tip, but if you everdo get malware, it’s sure to slow your computer’s boot time. With a good antivirus around like Microsoft Security Essentials, you’ll be more protected against that happening. Don’t like MSE? There are somegreat ones out there too, so there’s no reason not to have one around.

4. Remove Unnecessary Fonts

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeSince the dawn of time, Windows has loaded fonts at startup and slowed down the boot time. This is less of a problem than it used to be, but it can still slow you down a bit. Windows 7 loads over 200 fonts at startup; even more if you’ve installed Microsoft Office. Chances are, you use very few of those fonts, so you can hide them to speed up that process. In Windows 7, open up the Fonts folder from the Start Menu’s search box, and check off all the fonts you don’t need. Then click the “Hide” button in the toolbar. This way, if you ever want them, you can bring them back, but Windows won’t load them at startup. Note that just removing a few fonts probably isn’t going to make a noticeable difference—you’ll probably need to get rid of a few hundred. That said, you might have hundreds more fonts installed than you realized, so that isn’t as ridiculous as it sounds.

3. Upgrade Your RAM

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeInstalling more RAM has always been an effective way of speeding up your computer, and that hasn’t changed. RAM is pretty cheap these days, so if you’re running low, there’s no reason not to stock up and make your computer run a little smoother. We’ve gone over how to replace it in both a desktopand a laptop, and even for the inexperienced, it’s a pretty simple procedure.

2. Give Your Computer a Static IP

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeWhen you first start up your computer, it spends a significant amount of time asking the network for an IP address. You can get rid of this process altogether by giving your computer a static IP address that never changes. Not only does this make your network easier to manage (since each computer will always have the same IP address), but it can shave a bit more time off your startup. Here’s how to do it in different versions of Windows.

1. Install a Solid State Drive

Top 10 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer's Boot TimeThese days, your hard drive is probably the biggest bottleneck in your machine. One of the best upgrades you can make to your computer is to install a solid state drive, which has super-fast read times that can speed up your startup considerably. They’re certainly not a cheap upgrade, nor are they without their own maintenance requirements, but if you want to speed up your computer and its boot time, you can’t go wrong by installing an SSD. The difference will be shocking.


Again, these aren’t the only ways to shorten your computer’s boot time, but they are some of the most well-known, trusted methods that we’ve found.

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Linux is a great operating system and more often than not, it’s the installation of Linux that is the matter of discussion.

For a change, I will be talking about how touninstall Linux Ubuntu (or other operating systems) from a dual boot windows pc, and still being able to boot into other OS without much work. So let’s get started right away.

Backup your Linux files

It pops up everytime, but backup really is very important. If you have been using your Linux system for some time, chances are you would have created files you wouldn’t want to loose. In such a case, you can boot into Linux, backup your files (check out your Home directory) on an external device or onto a Windows partition.

Alternatively if you somehow managed to mess up and can’t boot into Linux, you can use ext2 IFS which allows you access to your Linux paritions. It can only read ext2 and ext3 filesystems though. If you are using other filesystems, you would have to look around a bit for a similar application. In any case, you can always boot from a Linux live CD to backup files if everything else fails.

Delete Linux Partitions

Next step: delete every Linux partition. That would include everything – boot, swap, home, whatever way you set up your system, it is time to delete all Linux partitions. There are a couple of ways to achieve this, easiest being from within Windows’ Computer Management. You need to:

how to uninstall ubuntu from dual boot windows pc

  • Log in to an account with administrative privileges.
  • Right click on My Computer, click ‘Manage’.
  • Choose ‘Disk Management’ listed under ‘Storage’ and you will see all of your partitions listed there.

how to uninstall ubuntu from dual boot windows pc

Next, you need to identify Linux partitions. The Linux partitions generally don’t have a file system listed with them if Windows doesn’t recognize it, so this can serve as a clue. Other ways can be identifying by size or partition number. You can use partition managers, these are generally better at identifying filesystems. Go ahead, delete the partitions, just make sure you delete the correct ones. Linux is gone and so is GRUB, which allowed you to choose operating system to use at boot time. So currently, you cannot boot into any other operating system, without some help. We are going to fix that soon.

Restore MBR

As we noted, GRUB is gone and so is the ability to boot into Windows. You would now need to boot from the Windows CD/DVD to restore the Master Boot Record. You can also use other Live CDs like one of my absolute favorites and highly recommended HBCD just in case you don’t have Windows installation media handy. Here are the steps:

  • Boot from Windows CD/DVD and choose “Repair” when it shows up.

uninstall ubuntu from dual boot pc

  • Choose command prompt on the resulting screen and run the following two commands:
    • bootrec /fixmbr
    • bootrec /fixboot

XP users need to run the recovery console from Windows XP CD and then type fixmbr when at the command prompt.

Reclaim free space

Restart now, remove the CD and you should be able to boot into your Windows installation. Once there, you should go ahead and reclaim the unpartitioned free space which was previously occupied by Linux. Doing so is simple and straight forward:

  • Fire up Disk Management as before.
  • Right-click on the unparitioned space, choose new partition or new logical drive.
  • Specify the size and other options according to your needs and you are done.

The free space should now be accessible from My Computer like any other partition. Alternatively, you can create multiple partitions from the free space or resize existing partitions to suit your needs.You can use utilities like GPartedEasues Partition Master or any one of the many partition managers on HBCD to perform such advanced tasks easily.


When you are having OS and you are going to delete the OS through windows you have to download the software EASYBCD

Step 1 – Check where the bootmgr resides

Open Disk Management and find the partition that is marked “active”. That is the partition that contains the bootmgr.

The active partition is usually from the OS that was on the system first – e.g. if you installedWindows 7 on an XP system, the XP system would be the active partition. But there are also other cases.

If Windows 7 was the first OS on the system, then your bootmgr resides most likely in a separatesystem partition which is usually small.

If you installed Windows 7 as first OS to a disk that was not attached to the Sata port0, it can very well be that the bootmgr resides on an arbitrary partition on the disk that is attached to port0.

If you have e.g. a Dell system, your bootmgr may be on the recovery partition. Other OEMs may do the same, but I was not able to verify that.

This is the example of my current system. Note the two last partitions which are Windows 7 and Windows 8. The Windows 7 partition is marked as active. You also see that I have no small system partition because I have eliminated that partition after I moved the bootmgr from that small system partition to the Windows 7 partition.

Dual Boot - Delete a OS-pic-1.png

If I would delete the Windows 7 partition, my Windows 8 would not boot any more because it would have lost it’s bootmgr that is in cohabitation with the Windows7 bootmgr.

In order to avoid such an unfortunate situation, we launch the system that we want to retain and move the bootmgr to that system’s OS partitionHere is how.

Step 2 – Delete the unwanted OS partition and reuse the space

Stay in the OS that you want to keep and open Disk Management. Right click on the partition that contains the OS you want to delete and Delete Volume. Then right click on the deleted volume and Delete Partition. Now you should have “Freespace” where this partition originally was.

With Disk Management, you can define a new partition in that freespace or you can add it to the partition that shows to the left of that freespce. Just click on the partition which is to the left and Extend Volume.

If, however, you want to add that freespace to a partition that is to the right of the freespace, then you have to use an external tool. I suggest the bootable CD of Partition Wizard. Here is how.

A word of caution: before you manipulate partitions with Partition Wizard, make an image of all partitions on that disk. I once lost all my partitions on a disk because I made a small mistake manipulating one partition with Partition Wizard. For imaging I recommend Free Macrium. Here is how.

Step 3 – Cleanup the bootmgr

Now that we removed one OS, we have a surplus entry in the bootmgr. We will remove this entry with EasyBCD. As you can see in the picture, the operation takes only 4 clicks.

EasyBCD is a very handy tool for a variety of operations on the bootmgr. You should have that in your toolkit anyhow.

Dual Boot - Delete a OS-pic-2.png

If you stop at this step, the MBR is still in a double boot configuration and when you boot, the BIOS will present you the black screen where you have to choose the operating sytem – although only one operating system is present. This is not a disaster, but it is an unnecessary step that requires your intervention.

The next two steps will reset the MBR to your current OS and then your system will automatically boot into that.

Important: You absolutely have to execute both Steps 4 and Step 5. If you only do Step 4, your system will not boot any more. 

Step 4 – Clean the MBR

Dual Boot - Delete a OS-pic-3.png

Step 5 – Reset MBR with the entry of the current OS

Dual Boot - Delete a OS-pic-4.png


GRUB got deleted; how to restore?

This will often happen if you install Windows after Linux. Windows assumes it’s the only operating system in the world and does not try to live with existing information present in the MBR; it overwrites it. For people with dual-boot and very little knowledge of Linux, this is a disaster. Luckily, it’s very easily recoverable one.

  • Boot from floppy disk or CD (any Linux live CD should do).
  • Get to the grub command line.
find /boot/grub/stage1 (optional)
root (hdX,Y)
setup (hd0)
quit

The same as before!

Windows is installed on a non-first hard disk (Swapping)

GRUB cannot directly boot Microsoft operating systems. And sometimes, even chainloading may not work, especially if Windows is not installed on the first hard disk. Once again, you should remember that you should always install Windows first, on the first hard disk, on the first partition (the rule of three first). Nevertheless, even if you have Windows installed on a separate disk, you can solve the problem by swapping.

You need to perform a virtual swap between hard disks. Like this:

map (hd0) (hd1)
map (hd1) (hd0)

After you add these two lines, you should be able to boot into Windows (or DOS, for that matter).

There is more than one Windows operating system installed on one hard disk (Hide/Unhide)

Again, Windows can cause problems if there’s more than one instance present on a hard disk, especially if installed on primary partitions. When you use the chainloader command, the control is transferred to the Windows boot loader, but which one?

The problem is easily solved by hiding and unhiding partitions. If GRUB hides a partition, it will not be visible by Windows and prevent a possible confusion. Vice versa, if you unhide a partition, Windows will detect it and be able to boot from it, without getting confused.

Here’s the example taken from the Manual that demonstrates this point.

Let’s say we have Windows installed on the first and the second partition of your hard disk. We wish to boot the first instance of Windows. Then, we need to execute the following set of commands to make it all work:

unhide (hd0,0)
hide (hd0,1)
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1
makeactive

You resized a partition; GRUB is gone

This is an interesting case. It can happen after you use a partitioning or an imaging software to make changes to the Partition Table. Usually, this will happen when you make such a change in Windows. Linux will not be informed of the change, because Windows is blind to anything else on the machine save Microsoft thingies. Consequently, GRUB will suffer.

The solution is that most likely the filesystem is damaged and needs to be repaired.

Boot from a live CD and execute the following commands, assuming you know where Linux partitions are.

Check the filesystem:

fsck.ext2 /dev/hdXY

Replace X and Y with hard disk letter and partition number that you want to check (hda2, hdb3, etc.).

Create the ext2/3 filesystem parameters again.

tune2fs -j /dev/hdXY

Now mount the root filesystem on /mnt/sysimage and run grub:

mount -t ext2 /dev/hdXY /mnt/sysimage
OR
mount -t ext2 /dev/hdXY /mnt/sysimagecd /mnt/sysimage/sbin
grub

You’re back to the familiar grounds.


Problem Statement :-If your computer is in the grub mode because of missing of bootmgr file ,there may be so many reasons behind this

1.May be you have dual booting in your system and you have deleted the other OS and deleted the drive in which the partition was installed .

2.Your windows goes somehow corrupt

3.In some cases due to kernel goes in panic mode and after that you reach to grub mode

So here only 27 commands work

So getting back to original windows follow some basic steps…

Method 1: Startup Repair from the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE)

============================================

1. Insert the Windows 7 installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer.

2. Press a key when the message indicating “Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …”. appears.

3. Select a language, a time and currency, and a keyboard or input method, and then click Next. 

4. Click Repair your computer.

5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, choose the drive of your Windows installation and click Next.

6. At the System Recovery Options Dialog Box, click on Repair your computer.

7. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

8. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Startup Repair.

Method 2: Rebuild BCD using the Bootrec.exe tool

============================================

To run the Bootrec.exe tool, you must start Windows RE. To do this, follow these steps:

1. Put the Windows Vista or Windows 7 installation disc in the disc drive, and then start the computer.

2. Press a key when you are prompted. Select a language, a time, a currency, a keyboard or an input method, and then click Next.

3. Click Repair your computer.

4. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.

5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt.


6. Type Bootrec.exe or Bootrec.exe/fixmbr, and then press ENTER.

7.Type bootrec/fixmbr

8.type bootrec/fixboot

Method 3: Use the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) to run System Restore

============================================

1. Insert the Windows 7 installation disc into the disc drive, and then start the computer.

2. Press a key when the message indicating “Press any key to boot from CD or DVD …”. appears.

3. Select a language, a time and currency, and a keyboard or input method, and then click Next.

4. Click Repair your computer.

5. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, choose the drive of your Windows installation and clickNext 

6. At the System Recovery Options Dialog Box, click on System Restore.

7. Follow the System Restore Wizard instruction as usual and choose the appropriate restore point.

8. Click Finish to restore the system.

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